“Crystals that will ease your pain!”

By Macsylver on Wednesday 8 February 2017 19:02 - Comments (16)
Category: Microscope, Views: 2.833

Almost everyone is familiar with painkillers, and most of us have taken them. But have you ever wondered about how they would look underneath a microscope? Of course your question at the time taking that painkiller would have been “will it ease my pain?”

There are a large number of painkillers available from the weakest aspirin to the strongest oxymorphone. Each works in a different way. Most people only need to take painkillers for a few days or weeks at most, but some people need to take them for a long time.

Painkillers can be taken by: mouth as liquids, tablets, or capsules, by injection, or via the rectum for example, suppositories. And some are even available as a creams or an ointment.

So why take micrographic pictures of pain medication?
Behind every used painkiller there is a story. Stories of the people taking their pain medication, but most of these stories are of course no happy stories. One day a few years back, I did not have a happy story, and I was bound for a long time taking strong pain medication.

During this period I was not really able to do my normal photography work. So I found back some old moleskins, and went trough all my notes. One think popped-up several times “Micrographs”. Combining my “two” passions; science and photography.

As an licensed medical laboratory analyst, I saw lots of beautiful things underneath the microscope when I was working at the RIVM. Capturing these moments in a form of art was always a wish.

So I started to build a setup that would enable me to go back to this “happy place”. Getting to know the world in a different way, by using things we “consume” in our “daily” life, but putting them underneath a microscope. Creating images “from another world” with a different perspective. Where structures, shapes, patterns, details, colours an many other things will (hopefully) make you look astonished.

After a lot of research about possibilities (within the available budget), I found my starting setup. A Novex B microscope that was able to show me some of the worlds within microscopy.

By “modding” this microscope I could use the techniques like; bright-field, cross polarised, dark-field, phase contrast and oblique illumination.

A few weeks later the setup arrived, and the first thing that popped-up in my mind, was to try and see if I can make the medicine I was taking visible. But unfortunately that first step of making the particular medication visible by trying to crystallise it failed.

So where to start?
Like the introduction almost everyone has taken some painkillers in there life, so we can all relate to these medicine. The most common OTC (over the counter) pain medications are aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, diclofenac & naproxen. So starting with these 5 painkillers would be a good start.

The First results
In the last months I have been experimenting allot to get the best results in therms of how to crystallise and capture these 5 OTC pain medications. I can happily report that I have managed to get beautiful micrographs of aspirin, acetaminophen & diclofenac.

https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/2000/1*IOenoPp01_tkgjnqQeQISA.jpeg
Diclofenac crystals after waiting for 72 hours, made visible by using a cross polarised light microscope.

https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/2000/1*9wmEYWfVqf_fAVNkIktYBg.jpeg
Diclofenac crystals after waiting for 72 hours, made visible by using a cross polarised light microscope. (100% zoom of above image)

https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/2000/1*rw3bb5o0nHnxwD0YVrUocA.jpeg
Acetaminophen crystals after waiting for 3 hours, made visible by using a cross polarised light microscope.

https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/2000/1*zcnZMKPscsZRvwFPi9ivYQ.jpeg
Acetaminophen crystals after waiting for 3 hours, made visible by using a cross polarised light microscope. (100% zoom of above image)

https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/2000/1*ESAIEjXHCfExYNvIIxJ0wg.jpeg
Aspirin crystals after waiting for 1 hour, made visible by using a cross polarised light microscope.

https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/2000/1*TA1hiAtixBmcsqC7Dn0Fww.jpeg
Aspirin crystals after waiting for 1 hour, made visible by using a cross polarised light microscope. (100% zoom of above image)

Work in progress:
Hopefully in the future I will be able to make ibuprofen & naproxen visual. This so my goal of having an exposition with these OTC pain medications can be realised, among the other legal and non-legal medication I would love to categorise and make visual.

So next time you take one of the world’s most popular painkillers aspirin, diclofenac or acetaminophen, envision this microscopic molecule working its magic in your body.

Volgende: “World’s most addictive and widely used drug” 13-02 “World’s most addictive and widely used drug”
Volgende: How do tears turn into art? 03-02 How do tears turn into art?

Comments


By Tweakers user Silent7, Wednesday 8 February 2017 19:44

NICE!
thanks for sharing this!

By Tweakers user JorisV, Thursday 9 February 2017 09:23

Absolutely marvelous!
I prescribe those drugs on a daily basis and this opens quit a different perspective. Thanks for sharing!


By Tweakers user ChojinZ, Thursday 9 February 2017 11:25

Hardstikke leuk topic en ik volg je dan ook graag. Maaruh, waarom altijd drug? Geeft dat de mooiste resultaten?
Downers op mijn werk? Nah.... doe maar niet.... Ik bewaar ze wel voor het weekend in combinatie met een goed glas wiskey... :+

[Comment edited on Thursday 9 February 2017 11:26]


By Tweakers user BrainCrash, Thursday 9 February 2017 14:01

Hele mooie afbeeldingen, zeker!
Wat ik me ineens afvraag:
Volgens mij worden in de meeste medicijntabletten allerlei vulstoffen gebruikt om het volume van de pilletjes op te vullen, dus er zal maar een heel klein gedeelte van de pil het daadwerkelijke medicijn bevatten.

Hoe zorg je dat je die vulstoffen afsplitst van je sample, en dus de pure gewenste kristallen overhoudt?

By Tweakers user Deadnet, Thursday 9 February 2017 17:51

But all 5 are from the same group,Socalled NSAIDS. .If you wish,I can give you a sample of Escitalopram,Trazodon,and Cloorpritixeen,Cause i am also curious How my lifesavers look.

By Tweakers user Macsylver, Thursday 9 February 2017 18:33

:o En waren ze nu extra lekker ;)
ChojinZ wrote on Thursday 9 February 2017 @ 11:25:
Hardstikke leuk topic en ik volg je dan ook graag. Maaruh, waarom altijd drug? Geeft dat de mooiste resultaten?
Toevallig was een van mijn vorige blogs over harddrugs, deze gaat dan over "medicinale drugs' m.b.t. pijnstillers. Ik heb vele series gemaakt van verschillende types drugs maar ook van dingen die niet bestempeld worden als drugs. Meer hierover later.
BrainCrash wrote on Thursday 9 February 2017 @ 14:01:
Hele mooie afbeeldingen, zeker!
Wat ik me ineens afvraag:
Volgens mij worden in de meeste medicijntabletten allerlei vulstoffen gebruikt om het volume van de pilletjes op te vullen, dus er zal maar een heel klein gedeelte van de pil het daadwerkelijke medicijn bevatten.

Hoe zorg je dat je die vulstoffen afsplitst van je sample, en dus de pure gewenste kristallen overhoudt?
Klopt, wat je normaal ziet is dat je alleen de "actieve stof" zou willen zien, daar je iets zou willen aantonen. In mijn geval gaat Micrograph Stories over de dingen die we zien, tegen komen en consumeren in ons dagelijkse leven. Ik kies er dan ook om om de gehele pil in dit project te gebruiken daar wij deze ook in het geheel consumeren. Uiteraard is het dan zo dat de vulstoffen "fillers" het overgrote gedeelte van het beeld zullen vormen (en in sommige gevallen lijken verschillende soorten medicijnen dus visueel erg op elkaar). Vulstoffen afsplitsen van de samples kan (niet altijd) en waar het kan verijst dit veel werk, materiaal en apparatuur.
Deadnet wrote on Thursday 9 February 2017 @ 17:51:
But all 5 are from the same group,Socalled NSAIDS. .If you wish,I can give you a sample of Escitalopram,Trazodon,and Cloorpritixeen,Cause i am also curious How my lifesavers look.
Dank, echter kan ik nooit beloven of het zal werken. In afgelopen jaar heb ik veel medicatie van mensen ontvangen om deze in beeld te brengen, echter lukt het maar met een klein deel om daadwerkelijk beeld te krijgen in de vorm van kristallen. Meer hierover volgt.

By Tweakers user Hkuit, Friday 10 February 2017 09:31

mooie plaatjes weer.

het allerlaatste plaatje klopt niet met de beschrijving: Je schrijft "Aspirin crystals after waiting for 1 hour, made visible by using a cross polarised light microscope. (100% zoom of above image)" maar ik zie precies hetzelfde plaatje als daarboven, dus geen 100% zoom, in tegenstelling tot bij de 2 medicijnen die eraan vooraf gingen.

By Tweakers user Macsylver, Friday 10 February 2017 14:51

Hkuit wrote on Friday 10 February 2017 @ 09:31:
mooie plaatjes weer.

het allerlaatste plaatje klopt niet met de beschrijving: Je schrijft "Aspirin crystals after waiting for 1 hour, made visible by using a cross polarised light microscope. (100% zoom of above image)" maar ik zie precies hetzelfde plaatje als daarboven, dus geen 100% zoom, in tegenstelling tot bij de 2 medicijnen die eraan vooraf gingen.
Thanks! ik ga het meteen fixen!

By Tweakers user Gamebuster, Friday 10 February 2017 14:55

Tekst is wel een beetje dunglish hoor

By Tweakers user Macsylver, Friday 10 February 2017 14:58

Gamebuster wrote on Friday 10 February 2017 @ 14:55:
Tekst is wel een beetje dunglish hoor
Dank voor je feedback, zou jij mij kunnen aangeven waar dit na jou inzicht het geval is. Dit zodat ik het e.v.t kan aanpassen.

By Tweakers user VictordeHolland, Friday 10 February 2017 18:59

Macsylver wrote on Friday 10 February 2017 @ 14:58:
[...]

Dank voor je feedback, zou jij mij kunnen aangeven waar dit na jou inzicht het geval is. Dit zodat ik het e.v.t kan aanpassen.
Ik vind het wel meevallen. Het is leesbaar en begrijpelijk, dat is waar het uiteindelijk om gaat.

Wat Gamebuster misschien bedoelt zijn stukken zoals:
"So I started to build..."
Impliceerd dat je in het verleden bent begonnen met bouwen en hier nog steeds mee bezigt bent (gezien je prachtige plaatjes niet het geval is).

Meestal wordt in het Engels de normale verleden tijd gebruikt (past simple).
to build --> I built a new house last year.

By Tweakers user Neallord, Saturday 11 February 2017 07:15

Dit kun je ook gewoon doen met kristalsuiker of vitamine C. :X

De meeste kristalvormige structuren onder een microscoop hebben lichtbrekende eigenschappen die er ingezoomd heel mooi uit zien.

Hoe dan ook, leuke foto's!

Groeten van een medelaborant.

[Comment edited on Saturday 11 February 2017 10:21]


By Tweakers user Neallord, Saturday 11 February 2017 07:35

BrainCrash wrote on Thursday 9 February 2017 @ 14:01:
Hele mooie afbeeldingen, zeker!
Wat ik me ineens afvraag:
Volgens mij worden in de meeste medicijntabletten allerlei vulstoffen gebruikt om het volume van de pilletjes op te vullen, dus er zal maar een heel klein gedeelte van de pil het daadwerkelijke medicijn bevatten.

Hoe zorg je dat je die vulstoffen afsplitst van je sample, en dus de pure gewenste kristallen overhoudt?
Geef het woord 'extractie' een hit op Google. ;)

[Comment edited on Saturday 11 February 2017 07:35]



By Tweakers user JAVE, Sunday 12 February 2017 23:20

Diclofenac :-(

NIet alleen slecht voor je maag, maar ook desastreus voor de gieren (Gyps) en regenboogforel.

Comments are closed